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  1. #196
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    The weird anomaly that is the US ccTLD - overshadowed by dot-com but still prime real estate, not even promoted but still growing faster than all competitors.
    Last edited by question; 03-09-2011 at 10:45 AM.

  2. #197
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    .US has a pretty good footprint now. Currently at 1,866,903 registrations. Would not surprise me to see it go over 2 million by end of year.

  3. #198
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    new TLDs

    New TLDs should be good for .US domains, as things that alter the .com/.us balance are important. Brand TLDs are about to do that I think. Brands are gearing up big time http://adage.com/article/digitalnext...omains/231483/ and wont miss this chance to own their name on the internet free and clear. So for the first time ever, .com will lose its place as undisputed corporate king.

    Most ccTLDs already operate as a location specific alternate, but this will be a direct hit against .com prestige, and where the right of the dot is in play, ccTLDs gain. Regards,

  4. #199
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    Same holds true for new generic or geoTLDs, but I see less of them being granted/successful. The subdomain model is a poor one in practice (until Twitter does it), particularly with current US govt overreaching on domain pull downs. And doesnt giving me say .music or .washington create control that ICANN wanted to eliminate in the first place with the opening of the namespace?

    Also, geoTLDs should actually help ccTLDs. GeoTLDs will be limited to local/regional, no national. So they dont encroach on ccTLD turf, and in geography the more stuff below you the better - ccTLDs are protected and promoted.

  5. #200
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    I think you might be disappointed.

    I can't see widely advertised .brands creating an impetus for many existing websites to move to different extensions. A website is integral to most businesses and the cost of moving extends far beyond the costs of new registrations. I can't see many maintaining multiple websites either so I'm not sure where all these new registrations are going to come from.

    Coming from a country where the ccTLD is widely used I thought .us would take off much better than it has. What I didn't realize six years ago was just how powerful first mover advantage of .com would be, if .us is struggling with a 307 million population most city gTLDs are likely to struggle more.

    And if city TLDs are going to struggle, single issue gTLDs like the ".environment ones" are really going to struggle because most people have multiple interests and there are very few committed eco warriors out there who actually want or need a website to communicate their message to the wider world.

    Open TLDs need usage and it's taken .info 10 years to get to 8 million registrations and it still doesn't offer any thing other than marginal competition for .com. If it takes that long when there is little competition, what chance do a myriad of .johnny-come-lately dreams launching at the same time? Even more niche open gTLDs lke .shop and .store are really going to struggle. Why? Because people just don't know they are there. The Internet makes the world seem much smaller than it really is.

    So it's very difficult to see how adding new open extension will drive real growth either.

    I've no doubt there will be lots of opportunities for domain investors to invest in sunrise after sunrise and I've no doubt there will be founders programs open to those who are able to sell prime generics for large sums to help set the perception of prices for other domains within the extension.

    You can be almost certain that virtually all of these new gTLDs will have little to no traffic for the foreseeable future which makes registering and renewing them an on going cost which has to be met.

  6. #201
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    I think that .com will stay the ultimate domain name for many years to come...
    famousentrepreneurs.wordpress.com

    Read the stories of some famous businesses here: largebusinessideas.blogspot.com

  7. #202
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpmgroup View Post
    I think you might be disappointed.

    I can't see widely advertised .brands creating an impetus for many existing websites to move..
    Maybe, but for any large company/organization that has a decent marketing budget, here's the chance to clean up and control your name..

    Also, no single gTLD ever stood a chance against .com. You need new class of TLDs for the strength to shift perceptions, like ccTLDs do very successfully (except so far in the US). Brand TLDs will be the same, and people will understand. But agreed geo and generic TLDs will be difficult, they're examples of single standing TLDs, traction will be tough.

  8. #203
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    ccTLDs were around well before the corporates decided they needed to be on the Internet therefore in their local market they often share the first mover advantage with .com. Some of our clients went with .com some went with .co.uk as their primary address. Nominet was claiming last year 73% of people look for a co.uk before a .com. (We find this preference is especially noticeable when people are buying goods or services and want cheaper postage and a place for returns or support).

    .eu suffers from this problem because it is not like a national ccTLD there are language issues, currency issues and cultural issues. We found many users will often try and find a .co.uk site rather than click on a .eu site in search engines listings.

    The best solution we found was to operate a local ccTLD in each of the countries you are doing business in. This is likely to be not good news for all but the most powerful of brands.

    I can understand why ICANN would want to use .brands to power their new gTLD proposals (and produce easy revenue for ICANN perhaps) but their thinking is quite flawed on many levels and it is going to lead to some serious costs and inequities and often for innocent third parties and ultimately that cost has to be borne by the consumer.


    I don't doubt major brands will apply and probably often more for the same reasons they bought the majority or the .xxx registrations to date.

    The big problem is for smaller entities and startups. If consumers come to recognize brands to the right of the dot as superior then by implication brands to the left of the dot are inferior.

    .brands will therefore destroy the ability to compete on a level playing field. At the moment to launch some software designed to compete with major brands such as Microsoft or Sun costs $10 + hosting a year then it's down to skill and innovation.

    Medium sized players will have to consider whether it's worth spending $185,000 + $25,000 per year with ICANN to enjoy the same level of implicit DNS branding and enter ICANN's .brand super league. For start ups and smaller players the cost of admission to this implicit DNS branding advantage is likely to prove prohibitive.

    The level playing field of the Internet will be destroyed.

    Creating super leagues or walled gardens for a handful of the most economically advantaged is rarely the best way forward especially over the longer term, and is more likely to damage and diminish the very innovation ICANN frequently claims it craves from new gTLDs.

  9. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpmgroup View Post
    The big problem is for smaller entities and startups. If consumers come to recognize brands to the right of the dot as superior then by implication brands to the left of the dot are inferior..

    The level playing field of the Internet will be destroyed.
    Correct these will mark the new commercial king. That's what set .com apart till now.

    I don't see any walled gardens or new inequity, good names always cost more than bad ones.

  10. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by question View Post
    Correct these will mark the new commercial king. That's what set .com apart till now.

    I don't see any walled gardens or new inequity, good names always cost more than bad ones.
    There is a whole difference between allowing people to compete in the second level and allowing a few contracted parties to compete from the top level against competitors who have to use the second level.

    Like I said before at the moment to launch some software designed to compete with major brands such as Microsoft or Sun costs $10 + hosting a year then it's down to skill and innovation.

    I can still go out today and register gpmsoft.com and for $10 + hosting and I can compete equitably with Sun & Microsoft. If .brands become accepted as generally superior small startups have an additional hurdle to overcome. This skews the advantage to largest incumbents and will have a very corrosive effect on competition which is exactly the opposite of what ICANN is claiming it hopes to achieve with new gTLDs.

    Only time will tell if the new .brands become "the new commercial king" and it will probably be a long time before we know. We can be almost certain that even if a few hundred brands migrate to the right of the dot it will have little influence on the success or otherwise of other new gTLDs and even less so on existing gTLDs like .us which is where we kind of hijacked this .us thread

  11. #206
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    Google's Blogger starts using ccTLDs to permit localized censorship- http://www.techdirt.com/articles/201...nsorship.shtml

  12. #207
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    Nuestars contract is up again this year and NTIA is taking comments - http://www.thedomains.com/2013/01/31...xpires-on-831/.

  13. #208
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    The page at NTIA that should be displaying public comments doesnt actually do that.

    Regardless, Id suggest those interested write in, obviously theres no defined group representing .US owners, but there should be. The email address is ustldnoi@ntia.doc.gov.

    Neustar seems a fine company, but shouldnt the management of this ccTLD also require some actual advertising and promotion, in addition to a stable backend?

  14. #209
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    I don't visit domainers' sites too often anymore, too narrow a viewpoint, but saw this and had to laugh..
    It's right on, as should be per a guy who helped grow the industry:
    --
    this.stuff
    is.not
    that.hard
    There are only so many ways you can say things and language will not change. Only the location of the dot will change.
    It.seems.confusing
    today.but
    itwont.tomorrow
    Laugh.now
    but.this
    will.look
    normal.one.day
    Just as it did in 1993, it will all start with the .BRANDS, and it will take time for those brands to market their TLDs into a use-pattern.
    itsa20year.journey
    and.it.starts
    next.year
    YOUR.COM will always have value but the upside in value will be limited by the changes to come.
    Hence my analogy: What would an AM radio station be worth today in the absence of FM and Satellite radio?
    Ask yourself what you will navigate to when every brand looks: LIKE.THIS
    Good luck to all.

    --
    I don't nearly have Frank's knowledge or experience in the industry but this all seems self evident to me as said before on this thread.
    Top brands and entities will use their own TLDs, no question about that.
    .com served the role as top TLD before, but will be no competition for one's OWN NAME/BRAND where this can be afforded.
    (Generic new TLDs are different and I don't think will reach critical mass by and large).
    So .com is no longer commercial king, and the dynamics shift.
    So people start searching to the right of the dot, and the dynamics shift.
    Things become more fluid, less structured, like the nature of the internet.
    Timing is another thing, we cannot control or predict that.
    I took a position in .US based on structural changes as mentioned earlier in this thread.
    I am good with my position, anomalies rarely last, however timing cant be as accurately predicted..
    Like real estate, you make decision based on fundamentals hopefully, not the clock.
    The internet is slowly becoming internationalized, that hurts .com which means (US) commercial.
    And that means ccTLDs more and more, slowly, imperceptibly.
    Also, with recent NSA related abuses coming to light, the world will more quickly turn away from US internet control/.com.
    Big picture. the relative decline of .com equals the relative rise of ccTLDs, there's nowhere else to go, big picture.
    Yes .com stays prominent, especially in the US.
    But there aint no good names left I hear
    We'll all see, cheers

    Larry
    http://our.us

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