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  1. #1
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    .US inevitability

    Hi all, new around these parts, will try to live up to my name.

    I noticed a report from last year and was struck by the 'market penetration' chart at chapter 1, page 8, which suggests the US lags big time in domain registration generally.

    Is this the accepted wisdom and what is this attributable to?

    Shouldn’t this gap narrow, and given that commonsense .coms, are scarce and pricey, doesn’t that bode well for .US registrations and in turn their values?

    http://www.nominet.org.uk/news/latest/?contentId=4617

  2. #2
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    Comparing TLDs is allways problematic.

    .US started out being used exclusively for US government websites. Most folks in the US "learned" to use .COM for commerical / commerce sites. So in the US we have the unique situation now of 2 sort of "country specific" TLDs for commerce, and old folks like me still have a bit of a reflex thinking .US is a government site.

    I think it's also easier for non residence to reg a .UK or .CN than it is to reg a .US - At least if you are going to follow the rules. I think .DE is an oddball as Germans *REALLY* seem to love domain names.

    I think the problem is with the statement "the US lags big time". There is no reason for a registry to have any particular number of registrations. In some ways the fewer registrations the better. For example Canada's .CA actually reversed itself and stop allowing non-residents to freely register domains, now there are very specific requirements. Canada felt it's TLD was a resource for it's citizens not the citizens of other countries, which reduces the reg count by reducing a lot of speculation.

    You probably want to read up on the many thread debate regarding this TLD indepedent issue.

    HTH

  3. #3
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    Re: .US inevitability

    Originally posted by question


    Shouldn’t this gap narrow, and given that commonsense .coms, are scarce and pricey, doesn’t that bode well for .US registrations and in turn their values?

    http://www.nominet.org.uk/news/latest/?contentId=4617
    This hasn't happen with other extensions such as .net/.org versus .com so I don't see why it would happen with .us. People place prime importance on the extension. The vast majority with go for a weaker .com before looking at a weaker extension.

    http://www.zooknic.com/Domains/counts.html
    GamesRoom.com, Possum.com, Arithmetic.com on greatdomains auction, low reserves, priced to sell!

  4. #4
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    Regarding the graph on page 8 in remember, need to remember that .us is the country code of the united states only in a very technical sense, so in my view it is pointless looking at popular country codes when evaluating .us. It is more an alt extension.
    GamesRoom.com, Possum.com, Arithmetic.com on greatdomains auction, low reserves, priced to sell!

  5. #5
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    I appreciate those comments and see that the failed geo-rollout of the .US extension, its lackluster promotion to date and fact that .com sold first all reduce mind share at present.

    But if end users drive the market and web development increasingly focuses on local/geo, the US lag becomes more important, especially where global ccTLD habits will keep chugging along and influence US habits, especially where .coms are essentially gone.

    Also, and I hate to say this as it doesn’t reflect current thinking, but doesn’t .com mean commercial, and doesn't that make it, literally, inappropriate for a large swath of sites which are developed around community and the like? Shouldn’t that become more obvious as we become more accustomed to ccTLDs?

    In Canada, we saw over the last few years how it became important for end users to use .ca, where attachment to geopolitical reality is necessary or desirable, such as for local credibility, shipping, legal, cultural reasons etc. the tipping point happens fairly quickly it seems.

    The good news is there’s lots of room for both generic and country code growth side by side.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by question
    But if end users drive the market and web development increasingly focuses on local/geo, the US lag becomes more important, especially where global ccTLD habits will keep chugging along and influence US habits, especially where .coms are essentially gone.
    I don't see it, all I do see is an unpromoted and largely unused extension going nowhere. Dot com's being "essentialy gone" isn't true either, the number of registered .com's is growing at a rate of approximately 30,000 names per day.

    Originally posted by question
    Also, and I hate to say this as it doesn’t reflect current thinking, but doesn’t .com mean commercial, and doesn't that make it, literally, inappropriate for a large swath of sites which are developed around community and the like? Shouldn’t that become more obvious as we become more accustomed to ccTLDs?


    Dot com means .commercial in the same was as .us is the country code of the United States. Both are true only in a largely meaningless technical sense. In reality .com means "The Internet" and .us means "The .com was gone, so .us is a potential alternate choice along with scores of other extensions"
    GamesRoom.com, Possum.com, Arithmetic.com on greatdomains auction, low reserves, priced to sell!

  7. #7
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    Unpromoted is the key, and that can change overnight with a change in mgmnt from Nuestar, who run this precious national resource as a second or third line of business.

    The future must belong to ccTLDs as only they can sort and segment an increasingly complex ecosystem, says humble me.

    And aren't these new .coms basically all nonsensical words and letters? Maybe fine for ppc or whatever but not for development or meaning.

    ..

    Agreed - .com means commercial and .US means USA, take your pick.

    Methinks the .com 'revolution' is long over, like my nasdaq portfolio. The internet is far more nuanced these days. ccTLDs *are geography, and geography increasingly matters. We cant just look behind us for future direction.

    Just my 2cents, cheers.

  8. #8
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    I've been waiting to use this one

    "... I've always thought .ca and America's .us could be sleeping giants, given the size of those nation's economies, the rapid expansion of the web and an ongoing trend toward localization ... "

    (Posted April 17, 2008) DNJournal.com Ron Jackson (Editor/Publisher)

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by question

    And aren't these new .coms basically all nonsensical words and letters? Maybe fine for ppc or whatever but not for development or meaning.

    It has been argued to death in the past here but basically the assumption of getting an "easier to remember" name in a new extension is not true. There is still lots of usable names in the .com namespace, if it was 5 times the size it is today that would still be the case.
    GamesRoom.com, Possum.com, Arithmetic.com on greatdomains auction, low reserves, priced to sell!

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by snoopy
    There is still lots of usable names in the .com namespace, if it was 5 times the size it is today that would still be the case.
    Also very important to point out that 90 to 95% of .COM regs are junk regs.

    I still think newcommers should grab a copy of the .COM zone file and go trough it *BY EYE BALL*. I think this is probably one of the most important, and effective, orientation steps that can be done. It might seem silly, but it unquestionable demostrates many of the issues we talk about, but "words" just don't have the bite that zone file reality has.

    And for those that do follow that recomendation, grab the .ORG zone, or .INFO, or .BIZ and look through it and if your eye's are open you'll immediately "get it".

  11. #11
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    And aren't these new .coms basically all nonsensical words and letters? Maybe fine for ppc or whatever but not for development or meaning.
    Like youtube.com which didn't exist before 2005?

    People have been saying .com is all gone since the beginning of the decade to argue for alternatives but .com has the gravity and momentum that makes companies want to find a .com that will work for them even if it's not the most prime keyword.

    Personally I think .us will carve out a niche at the low value level, but have to be realistic about how far it can go. Still, as long as the price you pay is less than the likely return then it's all good.
    When using google for counts - use double quotes for usage counts for multiword terms and set "match type" to "exact" for all search volume lookups. Click here for more info

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Today that is a great summation of how most people view .US but it is slowly gaining momentum with end users.


    [i]

    Dot com means .commercial in the same was as .us is the country code of the United States. Both are true only in a largely meaningless technical sense. In reality .com means "The Internet" and .us means "The .com was gone, so .us is a potential alternate choice along with scores of other extensions" [/B]

  13. #13
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    Personally, I still like .US...still buy them when they fit our niche. Like .TV it is a 2-letter acronym that is memorable and people worldwide know what it is. Don't know what .cc or .de is? Not worldwide.

    Though as long as Neustar is managing the .US, they will always be considered a failure by many, and will be undervalued IMO. Long-term management by Neustar could potentially...well, I don't even want to think about it. Some .US's did sell well today on TDNAM, despite Neustar's lack of any marketing.

    Examples of Neustar apathy:

    You would think NeuStar, Inc. would care enough to update it's copyright dates on one of the .us flagship sites Kids.us

    © 2003-2007 NeuStar, Inc. ...it is nearly June 2008 for crying out loud. Oh yea, they have been updating that one for sure

    http://kids.us/ does not work. One of the few sites on the web you must type in the "www". And these guys are managing the ccTLD? Oh yea...they care.

    GoDaddy is already doing a better job of marketing .ME, than Neustar is of doing whatever (I can't say marketing because they are not) to .US. What are they doing?

    Time will tell. But, as one who lives and works in the .US, "US" still has weight. My hope is that GoDaddy takes over in the future. GoDaddy dropped .US from it's default TLDs when you check a domain shortly after the lost the contract to partner and manage the .US.

    Now you get:

    .com* .tv .info* .org* .net* .mobi*

    Though to me, it is still an opportunity to buy. But it will be until the end of Neustar management that .US has any chance of reaching its potential. Having Neustar managing it too long may be devastating to it. I think it has hurt it tremendously already.

    Gee, if GoDaddy got it...who would they sign to promote it? Robbie Knievel?
    namedog - Chasing Good Domains & Keeping a Leg Up on the Competition

  14. #14
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    May 2008
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
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    Originally posted by safesys
    Like youtube.com which didn't exist before 2005?
    In a way, youtube.com makes the point for ccTLDs; they work alongside .com and other general extensions, and denote origin where appropriate. YouTube is a prime example of a site with no geopolitical connection. But if it was a site or service that met up with the daily grind, like making wedding videos in the US, or renting videos in France, then xxx.us or xxx.fr both make more sense as they are semantic and assist user navigation.

    Dot-com long tail meets the ccTLD cartel, (coming soon to the USA, maybe).

  15. #15
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    as snoop noted above, to all intents and purposes .com is the us cctld - they just let people from other countries use it too
    When using google for counts - use double quotes for usage counts for multiword terms and set "match type" to "exact" for all search volume lookups. Click here for more info

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